How do executives get comfortable in front of the camera?

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How do executives get comfortable in front of the camera? | Insurance Business America















IMCA experts share top tips for video success

How do executives get comfortable in front of the camera?


Insurance News

By
Jen Frost

Video can be a critical medium for getting a company’s viewpoint across and it is increasingly an expectation that executives will be ready and able to perform in the front of the camera.

For some, this comes naturally. But not everyone is a born star performer, and this is where media and marketing coaching comes in. Insurance Business spoke to three marketing and communications experts from the Insurance Marketing & Communications Association (IMCA) to find out how they prepare insurance leaders for their on-screen appearances.

Top tips for getting executives video ready included:

  • Preparation is key – know your message and practice
  • Try to approach it like a one-on-one conversation
  • Stick to the point, but this doesn’t mean reading off a script
  • Allow for warm up time
  • When someone very much is not comfortable, there are ways to work around this
  • Dress for the occasion, and make sure you avoid green!

What advice did the IMCA insurance marketers have for insurance executives looking to get video ready?

Insurance Business asked the IMCA insurance marketing experts: Video is a powerful marketing and story-telling tool.  What do you do when your executive team isn’t comfortable in front of the camera?

Jessica Marshall (pictured below), senior vice president, director of marketing, CRC Group and IMCA director and treasurer.

“Just jotting down the main points you want to cover and trusting your own knowledge to deliver the rest is the best way to build confidence.”

“Being comfortable on camera takes practice to make sure you’re coming across as genuine and relatable. When I know an executive is less comfortable, I do my best to approach it more like a one-on-one conversation than a presentation, which lends itself better to storytelling and helps take some of the pressure off.

“I prepare the questions in advance to give the person I’m working with time to organize their thoughts before it’s time to be on camera. Just jotting down the main points you want to cover and trusting your own knowledge to deliver the rest is the best way to build confidence.”

Charlene Goodwin (pictured below), vice president, marketing, Admiral Insurance Group and IMCA director

“If you have your messages down, it will be much easier to deliver them naturally on camera and your confidence as a subject matter expert will be evident.”

“Know your key messages. If you have your messages down, it will be much easier to deliver them naturally on camera and your confidence as a subject matter expert will be evident.

“Be concise. Choose no more than two to three key messages and stay on topic. Viewers have short attention spans and generally don’t need a long intro. Get straight to the point and deliver your messages. When speaking with the media, use the question ‘is there anything else you’d like me to know’ as an opportunity to state or restate your key messages.

“Practice, practice, practice! While you’re driving in your car or getting ready in the morning, you can practice your messages aloud and see how it feels. Do you feel that it flows as you’d hoped?

“Dress for the occasion. As a general rule of thumb, dark, solid colors will usually work best. Try to avoid distracting patterns, and avoid green if you will be in front of a green screen.

“Don’t be afraid to bring in the pros. If you have someone without on-camera experience, don’t be afraid to reach out to an agency and do some media training.”

“To work around it, we’ve limited the amount of time the leader is on camera, recording the main key points, and then using just the voice as background to either motion graphics or b-roll footage, which can be shot yourself or licensed stock video from several sources.”

“When the best way to reach an audience is through video, but your star leader isn’t comfortable in front of the camera, you can either work around it or work into it.

“To work around it, we’ve limited the amount of time the leader is on camera, recording the main key points, and then using just the voice as background to either motion graphics or b-roll footage, which can be shot yourself or licensed stock video from several sources. We’ve also integrated other employees to convey key points surrounding the leader’s main points.

“To work into it, preparation with the leader is key. Discuss together the main talking points, let them use their own voice and words versus being scripted or perform the recording like a conversational interview, and always allow warm up time before the formal recording to get the leader comfortable just speaking. Our leaders ‘perform’ in so many public or large-group environments – if you can get them in the mindset of a normal part of their job, the recording goes smoother.”

About the IMCA

All three of the expert marketers not only have years of insurance marketing experience under their belts, they are also members of the IMCA. The North American marketing trade association was founded in 1923 and is made up of individuals with expertise in marketing, public relations, corporate communications, and emerging digital communication practices. In addition to connecting professionals and seeking to elevate the insurance marketing profession, the organisation also has guidelines intended to maintain brand standards within the industry.

Do you have any top tips for getting video ready? Share your experience in the comments below.

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